Get a free SCARS short story. Sign up for News & Goodies from YA Author Cheryl Rainfield



My Books
See Next Book
STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

SCARS book cover

Kendra must face her past and stop hurting herself--before it's too late.

Awards: #1 in the Top 10 ALA Quick Picks, ALA's Rainbow List, a Governor General Literary Award Finalist, Staff Pick for Teaching Tolerance.

Yes, it's my own arm on the cover of SCARS.

HUNTED book cover

Caitlyn, a telepath in a world where having any paranormal power at all can kill her, must decide between saving herself or saving the world.

Awards: A finalist for the Monica Hughes Award for Science Fiction and Fantasy, and the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Award.

PARALLEL VISIONS book cover

Kate sees visions of the future--but only when she has an asthma attack. When she "sees" her sister being beaten, and a schoolmate killing herself, Kate must trigger more attacks--but that could kill her.

Awards: 2013 Gold Winner, Wise Bear Digital Awards, YA Paranormal category.

STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

See Previous Book

Love my books?
Join my Street Team!

You'll have my deep gratitude, hear book news first, get swag, and enter to win private contests

Teen Books That Have Something to Say


Shattering Glass

Review

Shattering Glass
by Gail Giles
Roaring Brook Press,(2002)
ISBN-10: 0761315810
ISBN-13: 9780689858000

My rating:



Simon was textbook geek. Skin like the underside of a toad and mushy fat. His pants were too short and his zipper gaped about an inch from the top. And his Fruit of the Looms rode up over his pants in back because he tucked his shirt into his tightey-whiteys. He had a plastic pocket protector, no joke, crammed with about a dozen pens and a calculator.
--Shattering Glass, Gail Giles, p. 1.

This is a disturbing, suspense-filled book about a group of high-school boys who first make the school outcast, Simon Glass, popular, and then kill him when he tries to do things his own way. The story is told by Young Steward, who is part of the popular group in his highschool, but feels he doesn't really belong, and could just as easily be an outcast. Young is close friends with the other popular kids in his clique, including Rob, a dynamic, persuasive, and controlling social leader.

Rob is the one who decides to make Simon Glass popular---and with the help of Young and the others, he succeeds. But Simon only goes along with Rob's plans as much as he wants to, until the others, who blindly follow Rob. Simon also does things his own way, and stands up to Rob when he wants to. So Rob tries to wrest back his control, by making Simon even more popular---demanding that Young give up his girlfriend for a special dance, and hand her over to Simon. Young does this---even though it means that he loses the girl he loves.

Simon displays a streak of cruelty towards the people he doesn't like, and is depicted in such a way that the reader will not feel much empathy for him--but his death, eluded to throughout and finally depicted in the end of the novel, is disturbing.

As the story moves forward, we are given glimpses as to why each of the characters act as they do.

Giles successfully portrays Young as a sympathetizable character, at least until he willingly hands over his girlfriend to be used in the ploy to make Simon popular, treating her like an object. Giles' use of teen speech and slang is excellent; the characters' language is vivid, very male, and believable. Her descriptions are vivid, and there is a thoughtfulness woven through the story that compels us to think about the impact of blindly following others.

Most of the characters are fairly rounded, and the writing is fresh, vivid, and masterful. An excellent device that keeps tugging the reader forward, through all the chapters, are the quotes at the beginning of each chapter from various minor and major characters in the book, foreshadowing events to come, and giving us added perspective and depth that we would not have otherwise. Although, for me, the last tenth of the book lost some of its grip as Rob acted with such indifference, and I would have preferred a little more depth and insight, the book is a compelling, fast-paced, believable read. If you like happy endings, don't pick up this book.

Disturbing, chilling, and believable. A great read! You'll want to check out Giles' other book after reading this one.

-Added August 01, 2003


Want more books?

Go back to Boy Books: For Girls, Too to find great Teen Books That Have Something to Say.

Or, go to Teen Books That Have Something to Say to see all of the books.