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STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

SCARS book cover

Kendra must face her past and stop hurting herself--before it's too late.

Awards: #1 in the Top 10 ALA Quick Picks, ALA's Rainbow List, a Governor General Literary Award Finalist, Staff Pick for Teaching Tolerance.

Yes, it's my own arm on the cover of SCARS.

HUNTED book cover

Caitlyn, a telepath in a world where having any paranormal power at all can kill her, must decide between saving herself or saving the world.

Awards: A finalist for the Monica Hughes Award for Science Fiction and Fantasy, and the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Award.

PARALLEL VISIONS book cover

Kate sees visions of the future--but only when she has an asthma attack. When she "sees" her sister being beaten, and a schoolmate killing herself, Kate must trigger more attacks--but that could kill her.

Awards: 2013 Gold Winner, Wise Bear Digital Awards, YA Paranormal category.

STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

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Teen Books That Have Something to Say


Out of Order

Review

Out of Order
by A M Jenkins
HarperCollins,(2003)
ISBN-10: 0066239680

My rating:



I'm in a bad mood, walking into first-period biology. If I had my books, I'd slam them on the lab table.
But I don't have them. They're in the bottom of my locker where I left them. I don't feel like doing any work today.
I slump down in my seat. I fold my arms over my chest. I don't laugh or talk to anybody, and everybody who has eyes can see not to mess with me.
--Out of Order, A. M. Jenkins, p. 3

Sophomore Colt Trammel hates high school, his learning disability, and people who tick him off. He is angry at the world, and deliberately provokes people, and works to keep people at a distance. He acts like a bully. His only soft spots are baseball, which he excels at and truly enjoys, and Grace, a girl he has been in love with for years.

But Grace doesn't seem to love him back, and she dumps him. On top of that, his grades are down, and his mother won't let him play baseball if he doesn't get his grades back up. Colt ends up feeling smashed inside, and even more desolate. The only thing that saves him, besides baseball, is his new friendship with Corinne, an intelligent, honest girl who's new to the school, and who doesn't allow him to boss her around. Corinne stands up to Colt, and ends up tutoring him in English. Through Corinne, Colt begins to change and develop some compassion.

Colt's voice is incredibly strong and unique. Colt, and all the other characters in this book, feel like real people. As the reader, I believed that beneath Colt's meanness was kindness. Colt's character stayed true and beleiveable for the entire book; I was never once jolted out of his character, or made to question his actions. (The only distracting thing for me were the times when Colt addressed the reader, but that is a personal reaction.)

Colt's character has layers and depth to him, and his gradual changes throughout the book are done in a nice movement. The writing also has nice subtleties, and allows us to see that while Colt is not as intelligent as some people, he isn't as stupid as he thinks he is.

I've never read a book that so successfully made me deeply care about a jerk of a protagonist, as Out of Order did--or a book that allowed me to see so clearly the vulnerability of a jerk, and actually end up liking some of him. Jenkins gets inside the characters so deeply.

The ending is satisfying, and leaves the reader to decide some things for her or himself.

This is an emotionally satisfying, moving, gripping, read. Fast-paced, always interesting, and a book that you can't put down. Out of Order is skillfully written, and powerful. Highly recommended.

-Added February 08, 2005


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