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STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

SCARS book cover

Kendra must face her past and stop hurting herself--before it's too late.

Awards: #1 in the Top 10 ALA Quick Picks, ALA's Rainbow List, a Governor General Literary Award Finalist, Staff Pick for Teaching Tolerance.

Yes, it's my own arm on the cover of SCARS.

HUNTED book cover

Caitlyn, a telepath in a world where having any paranormal power at all can kill her, must decide between saving herself or saving the world.

Awards: A finalist for the Monica Hughes Award for Science Fiction and Fantasy, and the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Award.

PARALLEL VISIONS book cover

Kate sees visions of the future--but only when she has an asthma attack. When she "sees" her sister being beaten, and a schoolmate killing herself, Kate must trigger more attacks--but that could kill her.

Awards: 2013 Gold Winner, Wise Bear Digital Awards, YA Paranormal category.

STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

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Teen Books That Have Something to Say


Theories of Relativity

Review

Theories of Relativity
by Barbara Haworth-Attard
HarperCollins Canada,(2003)
ISBN-10: 0006392997

My rating:



I have a theory that every fourth person will give me money. Like any good theory, mine is based on experimentation and observation. It's time-consuming, but it's not like I have anything better to do.
...
Yellow leaves fill the pool, and cold winds keep people away. Except me. I sit here and ask for money. Every day.
--Theories of Relativity, Barbara Haworth-Attard, p. 1.

Sixteen-year-old Dylan has lived on the streets ever since his mother kicked him out when she realized that he might interfere with her snagging another husband. Although new to the streets, lonely, and vulnerable, Dylan is smart enough to stay away from pimps and people who prey on street kids. Jenna, a street kid he's attracted to, isn't so lucky or strong, and though he keeps trying to help her, she just gets pulled deeper and deeper into an abusive and self-destructive spiral. But after a series of misfortunes, Dylan begins to get sucked into the same spiral, and he has to depend on his strength, determination, and the help of others to try to free himself and gain back his independance and power.

This is a powerful, painful book that doesn't shy away from the truth of life on the streets—with just enough scraps of positivity to keep the reader reading and rooting for Dylan. Dylan and Jenna especially are strong characters, and there are enough kind people and moments to help balance out the painful ones. There are also a few unbelievable moments that may briefly draw the reader out of the book—but the book has such high stakes and good writing that the reader will most likely keep diving in again to see what happens.

At times the characters feel distant—as if they're observing and reporting on what's happening to them, instead of living it—but for the most part these characters feel very real. The many street characters are differentiated by unique mannerisms, styles of dress, and ways of being that make them memorable, but there are a few times when it seems unlikely that the same characters would show up in every situation.

This is a gripping, moving book that knows pain inside out. It is both gritty and hopeful. Well worth reading.

-Added August 2004


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