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STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

SCARS book cover

Kendra must face her past and stop hurting herself--before it's too late.

Awards: #1 in the Top 10 ALA Quick Picks, ALA's Rainbow List, a Governor General Literary Award Finalist, Staff Pick for Teaching Tolerance.

Yes, it's my own arm on the cover of SCARS.

HUNTED book cover

Caitlyn, a telepath in a world where having any paranormal power at all can kill her, must decide between saving herself or saving the world.

Awards: A finalist for the Monica Hughes Award for Science Fiction and Fantasy, and the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Award.

PARALLEL VISIONS book cover

Kate sees visions of the future--but only when she has an asthma attack. When she "sees" her sister being beaten, and a schoolmate killing herself, Kate must trigger more attacks--but that could kill her.

Awards: 2013 Gold Winner, Wise Bear Digital Awards, YA Paranormal category.

STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

See Previous Book

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Teen Books That Have Something to Say


The Chrysalids

Review

The Chrysalids
by John Wyndham
Stanley Thornes (reissue),(2001)
ISBN-10: 0748742867

My rating:



He frowned a bit again. "Wouldn't it be more fun to do your chattering with some of the other kids?" he suggested. "More interesting than just sitting and talking to yourself?"
I hesitated, and then because he was Uncle Axel and my best friend among the grownups, I said:
"But I was."
"Was what?" he asked, puzzled.
"Talking to one of them," I told him.
--The Chrysalids, John Wyndham, p. 30.

David lives in a very strict, religious community that exists probably thousands of years after the world was destroyed by nuclear bombs (although his society attributes the destruction to sin). His society does not tolerate the many genetic mutations that exist—mutant animals and crops are destroyed, and mutant people banished.

David's father is a harsh leader in the community, finding and banishing or destroying mutants. What his father doesn't realize is that David is one of those mutants—David can communicate by telepathy. He communicates with his cousin, Rosalie, and a number of other children scattered around the community that he has never met—and later, with his baby sister, Petra.

As David's sister Petra grows up, she becomes a problem for David and the other telepath children, as Petra's power is so strong, whenever she is upset or greatly frightened, she radiates a call for help so strong that all the other telepaths drop whatever they are doing and rush towards her—actions that cause great suspicion in their community.

Then some of the telepaths are discovered and tortured by the community, and David flees with his sister and cousin, and meets up with the other telepaths who were able to escape. The men of their society—including David's father—follow them, trying to hunt them down and kill them. As they flee, Petra keeps telepathically talking to a voice that none of the other telepaths can hear—until finally, they, too, can hear her...and they are eventually rescued.

A story that can be frightening, at times, at the hatred and prejudice that some people can hold, especially religious zealots—but heartening, too, at David's humanity and compassion, and the kind community of telepaths. At times the book is slow, but it's a wonderful read, fraught with tension, suspense, and a fight between rigid prejudice and compassion.

Also worth reading is Chocky by John Wyndham, again involving a boy with psychic abilities, though this time the boy is connecting with a being from another planet.


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