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STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

SCARS book cover

Kendra must face her past and stop hurting herself--before it's too late.

Awards: #1 in the Top 10 ALA Quick Picks, ALA's Rainbow List, a Governor General Literary Award Finalist, Staff Pick for Teaching Tolerance.

Yes, it's my own arm on the cover of SCARS.

HUNTED book cover

Caitlyn, a telepath in a world where having any paranormal power at all can kill her, must decide between saving herself or saving the world.

Awards: A finalist for the Monica Hughes Award for Science Fiction and Fantasy, and the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Award.

PARALLEL VISIONS book cover

Kate sees visions of the future--but only when she has an asthma attack. When she "sees" her sister being beaten, and a schoolmate killing herself, Kate must trigger more attacks--but that could kill her.

Awards: 2013 Gold Winner, Wise Bear Digital Awards, YA Paranormal category.

STAINED book cover

Sarah, a teen with a port-wine stain and body image issues, is abducted, and must find a way to rescue herself.

“Powerful. I raced through it, wanting to know if Sarah would find a way to escape both her captor and her self-doubts. A real nail-biter!“
- April Henry, NY Times bestselling author of The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die

See Previous Book

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Teen Books That Have Something to Say


Colibri

Review

Colibri
by Ann Cameron
Farrar, Straus and Giroux,(August 2003)
ISBN-10: 0374315191

My rating:



When we were on the road, Uncle was a man you would hardly notice, with his simple white shirt and black pants and his eyes cast down. But once he sat in front of a church or at the edge of a market to beg, he changed.
It was as if he reached into the air for a thick coat of goodness and pulled it around himself and made himself bigger. You couldn't walk by him without noticing his humility. You would think he was a man who would never quarrel with anybody, and even if someone insulted him, he was so humble the insult would wash right off him. You would think he was a sober man, and if you gave him money he would never use it to get drunk, the way a lot of beggars do....
--Colibri, Ann Cameron, p. 10-11.

12-year-old Tzunun was kidnaped from her family when she was four, and now she travels through Guatemale with "Uncle"—a lying, cruel, greedy, crooked man. Uncle is nothing like the little she remembers of her parents—he tries to make her lie and cheat for money, while her mother taught her to be honest. "Uncle" repeatedly reminds her that he only keeps her around because the fortunetellers have assured him she will lead him to a treasure. Tzunun would be alone in the world without Uncle—penniless, without shelter, and with no idea of how to find her real family. So she sticks close to Uncle, even though he does not treat her well, and she longs for the day when she might find her family, and she will be called by her rightful name, instead of Rosa, the name Uncle insists on.

Tzunun tries to stay true to what her mother taught her—to be honest; it is the only thing she has left of her. When Uncle tries to make her lie, Tzunun is physically unable to. Slowly, small chunks of Tzunun's memory begin to come back. Somehow Tzunun finds the courage she needs to stand up to Uncle, and to leave him. In so doing, she sets off the chain of events that lead Uncle to the fortune he craves, and lead her to her real parents.

If the story feels weak in a few places, or Tzunun's fears are not built up strongly enough, the rich, vivid description and setting outweigh this. The reader gets a real taste of Tzunun's surroundings, and for the most part, of her character. The powerful, eloquent language pull us forward throughout the story, to the gradual flowering of the truth, and the compelling climax. Uncle is portrayed throughout the story as a thoroughly unlikable character, so we feel only relief when Tzunun gets away from him. Beautiful metaphors spice the story, bringing greater meaning. Although the ending feels a little too pat, we root for Tzunun to finally find some happiness. A strong, gentle story woven with layers of depth and insight.

-Added August 17, 2003


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